International Journal of Computer Networks & Communications (IJCNC)

AIRCC PUBLISHING CORPORATION

IJCNC 06

ADAPTIVE RANDOM SPATIAL BASED CHANNEL ESTIMATION (ARSCE) FOR MILLIMETER WAVE
MIMO SYSTEM

Rajkumar M Vadgave1 , Manjula S2 and T S Vishwanath3

1Department of Electronics & Communication Engineering, Veerappa Nisty Engineering College, Shorapur, India

2Department of Electronics & Communication Engineering, Lingaraj Appa Engineering College, Bidar, India

3Department of Electronics & Communication Engineering, Bheemanna Khandre Institute of Technology, Bhalki, India

ABSTRACT

Millimeter-wave and mMIMO communications are the most essential success systems for next-generation wireless sensor networks to have enormous amounts of accessible throughput and spectrum. Through installing huge antenna arrays at the base station and performing coherent transceiver processing, mMIMO is a potential technology for enhancing the bandwidth efficiency of wireless sensor networks. The use of mmWave frequencies for mMIMO systems solves the problem of high path-loss through offering greater antenna gains. In this work, we provide a design with a random spatial sample structure that incorporates a totally random step before the analogue is received. It contains a totally random step before the analogue received signals are sent into the digital component of the HBF receiver. Adaptive random spatial based channel estimation (ARSCE) is proposed for channel session measurement collection, and an analogue combiner with valves has been used to estimate the signals at each receiving antenna. The proposed optimization problem formulation attempts to discover the orientations and gains of wideband channel routes. In addition, our proposed model has compared to various state-of-art techniques while considering error minimization.

KEYWORDS

Millimeter-wave (mmWave), massive multi-input–multi-output (mMIMO), Hybrid Beamforming (HBF), Channel Estimation, Error Minimization.

1 INTRODUCTION

Modern broadband cellular systems will have to keep up with the demand for high-speed data capabilities, which is expected to skyrocket. Two major ways to meet these needs are largeantenna-array multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) designs (also known as massive MIMO / m-MIMO) and millimeter wave (mmWave) systems. The mMIMO is preferred when the objective is to enhance spectral and energy efficiency, whereas the mmWave approach maximises a broader bandwidth [1]. Many contemporary commercial mobile network systems operate at frequency band below 6 GHz, whereas millimeter wave communications utilise the spectrum from roughly 30 GHz to 300 GHz. The major benefit of owning at higher frequencies is the possibility of significantly greater bandwidth channels [2].

The mmWave communications potential for cellular networks has been acknowledged in [3], as well as its ability to offer extremely high throughput. Even in non-line-of-sight conditions, [4] [5] claimed a transmission distance of far more than 200 m. For 5th generation (5G) cellular networks and beyond, millimeter wave communications are of interest [6]. Modern signal processing approach are required to make mmWave communication systems commercially viable [4], [6]. There are several reasons behind this: new hardware restraints develop as a result of operating at larger bandwidths and higher frequencies and, mmWave channel characteristics change. Significant antenna arrays are required to achieve large beamforming gains, which brings additional power consumption and circuit implementation issues.

Conventional digital precoding is too expensive to implement in millimeter-wave communication systems. As a result, hybrid precoding is a superior option that works at mixes of digital and analogue precoding. It’s generally based on one of two types of structures: subconnected and completely linked, whereas the completely linked structure has been intensively explored in the academic world because it can reach the theoretical ideal spectrum efficiency. In [4], the spatial sparsity of the mmWave channel was used to reconstruct the hybrid precoding problem. The orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) method was suggested to tackle the problem and greedy algorithm is presented based on the OMP method in [7].

The antenna array shape is not taken into account by the method, which substantially decreases computing complexity while maintaining high performance. By choosing an appropriate threshold, an orthogonal matching pursuit method with performance similar to the optimum and higher than the OMP algorithm is provided [5]. Even though OMP approach has good speed, it has a rather high level of complexity, so as a result, [6] investigates a high-performance and realtime precoding approach based on SVD (singular value decomposition). Overall performance of this technique is comparable to the OMP algorithm, but the complexity is significantly lower. An alternative minimization method based on the concept of manifold optimization is proposed in [8], which reduces the program’s complexity. Many researchers have been drawn to the subconnected structure because of its features, which allow it to strike a proper balance between cost and performance. However, unlike fully connected structure, which has a one-to-one correlation between both the antenna and the RF chain, each RF chain in the subconnected configuration is only linked to a portion of the antenna. As a result, in recent years, hybrid precoding techniques using subconnection architectures has gotten a lot of interest.

With the aid of semidefinite relaxation, an alternative minimization method for the subconnected structure is also constructed in [8]. In a similar vein, [9] proposes a novel divide-and-conquer precoding method, this scheme’s performance is comparable to SDR- alternative minimization, that can save time and is resistant to potential saddle spots with underperformance. In [10], a hybrid precoding method based on SIC (successive interference cancellation) is presented in response to the hybrid precoding challenge of energy-saving subconnection design. It eliminates the need for matrix inversion and SVD and it has a considerably low computational cost than standard sparse reconstruction precoding techniques. The sparsity and low rank characteristics of specific wireless channels were recently combined for effective channel state information (CSI) estimation in [11] [13]. In [12], a two-step approach (one stage per channel attribute) was developed for narrowband mmWave MIMO channel estimation with Hybrid Beamforming (HBF) transceivers. In [13] proposed a matrix completion method that took advantage of these features for the same transceivers and narrowband channels with simple switches. This approach outperformed the approach of [12] in terms of estimate performance while needing just brief channel sounding periods. In [14], wideband mmWave MIMO channels featuring frequency selectivity were recently introduced, which offered a CSI estimation approach that used the sparsity of the channel in frequency and time domains.

In this paper, we provide a unique analogue combining design with a random spatial sampling layout, which includes a purely random stage before the analogue received signals are fed into the HBF receiver’s digital component. This design is utilized for channel session measurement gathering, and an analogue combiner with valves was used to approximate the signals at receiving antennas individually. The proposed model named as adaptive random spatial based channel estimation (ARSCE) and this design major feature is the random choice of available analogue receive beams during channel period. It combined with the proposed CSI estimation approach, results in enhanced performance with short training periods. The matrix generated at the HBF receiver following analogue processing of training signals containing multiple receiving beams has the same rank as the wideband mmWave m-MIMO channel matrix. Based on this discovery, we devise a CSI estimate optimization model that takes use of both the low-rank feature of the sparsity of the channel matrix and the received training signal matrix in the beamspace space. The suggested optimization problem formulation seeks to identify the wideband channel routes’ orientations and gains. The distinctions are in the mathematical formulas. The low-rank feature of narrowband mmWave m-MIMO channels is used to determine the measurement needs for them and the scalability of the technique in wideband mmWave mMIMO channels.

2. LITERATURE SURVEY

In m-MIMO systems, hybrid beamforming designs are developed to reduce hardware and training overhead costs. The carrier frequency (mmWave), CSI (average or instantaneous), and complexity of hybrid beamforming may all be categorized to reduce the switched complexity. The method to use to achieve the optimal tradeoff between these factors is determined on the application and channel characteristics [15], while obtaining specific and reliable CSI for Multi user-mMIMO systems at millimeter waves is difficult because to the large number of BS antennas. In mMIMO, a combined iterative approach based on step-length optimization may be used to obtain accurate channel estimate [16]. In the context of faulty CSI and hardware restrictions, a beamforming neural network (deep learning networks) for mmWavemMIMO systems can improve the beamforming layout and is resilient with greater spectrum efficiency as compared to standard beamforming methods [17]. In mMIMO systems, the ideal number of UEs programmed concurrently for a specific number of BS antenna components offers maximum spectrum efficiency. The frequency spectrum of downlink (DL) and uplink (UL) can be the same (allowing combined network improvement), and it is also independent of UE locations at any given time [18]. In comparison to existing methods, the multitask deep learning (MTDL)-based HBF algorithm for mmWavemMIMO OFDM systems can provide good results in terms of runtime and sum-rate [19].

Based on the arrival/departure angle and with the fewest number of pilots, an effective channel estimate technique for the time-varying DL channel of mmWave MIMO systems is suggested [20]. With flawless CSI and a low-complex single-cell DL mMIMO HBF system, the sum-rate approaches optimal network throughput is shown in [21]. The performance difference between hybrid and digital beamforming can be narrowed for a specific number of Relay nodes by decrease the quantity of multiplexed symbols [22]. In comparison to OMA systems, clustering and feedback-based hybrid beamforming for DL mmWave MIMO NOMA systems provide highest sum-rates [23]. A multi user (MU) detection technique based on a ‘‘markov random field” for model cluster sparsity and predict mMIMO channel outperforms systems which do not take use of channel cluster sparsity [24]. In developing hybrid beamforming for broadband mmWave MIMO systems, eigenvalue decomposition, manifold optimization, and OMP algorithms give BER and spectral efficiency (SE) that is closer to completely digital BF solutions [25]. When the number of RF chains in a mmWavemMIMO system increases, the best hybrid combining and precoding approaches utilising the OMP algorithm to achieve total sum-rates that are comparable to completely digital precoding [26].

Hybrid beamforming with user scheduling technique is described for DL to increase throughput (near to completely digital beamforming) of mmWavemMIMO OFDM systems (users with similar strongest beams). Digital beamforming is used to achieve the highest performance increase (by minimising excess inter-user congestion) [27] and analogue beamforming vectors are utilised to determine the ideal beam of each consumer. For mmWave MIMO uplink channels, a low computational complexity hybrid beamforming system minimises inter-user interference while performing similarly to a completely digital beamforming architecture. In mmWavemMIMO systems based on Generalized Low Rank Approximation of Matrices, the coordinated RF beamforming method requires just composite CSI rather than the entire physical channel matrix.

In both FDD and TDD systems, this method gives a competitive option by addressing the coordination between BS and UEs to get maximum array gain with no dimensionality limitation [22]. HBF is used in mmWavemMIMO relay systems to improve sum-rates via lowering the sum MSE between both the received signal of hybrid and digital BF schemes. The overall sum-rates rise as the correctness of arrival/departure angles and the number of RF chains rise [28] and the possibility of low-cost analogue optimal unconstrained precoder, RF hardware implementations, and combiner methods for mmWavemMIMO systems are proposed. The suggested methods’ numerical findings demonstrated that the SE of mmWave systems with transceiver hardware restrictions approaches the unrestrained performance limits [29]. In mmWavemMIMO systems, low-complexity phased-ZF hybrid precoding is utilised in the RF domain to get substantial power gains and low-dimensional ZF precoding has been used in the baseband domain allowing multistream operations [30].

3. PROPOSED METHOD

Which subject to,

The answer to eq. (14) is believed to be derived using the Singular Value Thresholding (SVT)
function as follows [32]:

where and contain the right and left singular vectors, of the matrix ( , and
with singular values denoted by . The set of equations must be solved, which
necessitates the inversion of the matrix. However, because this matrix is diagonal, the resultant
issue is identical to solving the mathematical model shown below;

4. RESULTS AND ANALYSIS

In this part, we explore a mmWave MIMO technology for various hugeA and values, and we evaluate the performance of the suggested wideband channel estimation approach for HBF transmission utilising the adaptive random spatial combining design. MATLAB 2016b with system configuration intel i7 processor, 16GB RAM and windows 10 operating system was used to generate all computational simulation results. We particularly simulated the Average Mean Square Error (MSE) performances, which were then averaged across several Monte-Carlo realizations. We also examined the suggested approach’sconvergence rate and computing expense in comparison to similar state-of-the-art approaches.

The singular value thresholding (SVT) [32] method is used to solve the rank constrained optimization problem. Although iterative thresholding algorithms, such as Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) [14], can efficiently solve the L1 minimization with low computational burden, they only deliver excellent estimation accuracy for highly sparse vectors, i.e., when the unknowable vector only has the few non-zero qualities. Message passing techniques, such as Vector Approximate Message Passing (VAMP) [34], on the other hand, give more robust estimate performance in terms of signals with reduced sparsity and also measurements with increasing noise level. These approaches have considered for the comparison with proposed approach.


Figure 1. NMSE efficacy as a proportion of training frame number

Considered parameter details for figure 1; 16 number of transmitting antennas, 32 number of the receiving antenna, total number of clusters 4, channel realization 6, 4 receive RF chains, 5 to 40 training frames, and -15 SNR with 20 algorithmic iterations. The NMSE efficacy of the proposed channel estimation approach versus the training frames number F is shown in figure 1, where the training frame numbers; 5, 15, 25, 35 and 40 were considered for the analysis. At training frame 15, our proposed ARSCE approach has got 15.64% and 14.25% less NMSE as compared to SVT and OMP approaches. Similarly at 40 training frames, proposed ARSCE approach has achieved 51.83% and 27.24% less NMSE as compared to SVT and OMP approaches. As per the figure 1, it clearly visible that the NMSE values are decrease while increment in training frame numbers and our proposed approach error decreasing w.r.t state-of-the-art methods.


Figure 2. NMSE efficacy as a proportion of RF chains number


Figure 2. NMSE efficacy as a proportion of channel delay taps number

Considered parameter details for figure 2; 16 number of transmitting antennas, 32 number of the receiving antenna, total number of clusters 4, channel realization 6, 16 receive RF chains, 5 training frames, and -5 SNR with 20 algorithmic iterations. The proposed channel estimation approach NMSE efficacy versus the RF chains number is shown in figure 2, were RF chains number i.e., 4, 8, 12, and 16 considered. At 8 RF chains number, proposed ARSCE approach has achieved 16.63% and 33.98% less NMSE as compared to OMP and VAMP approaches. The performance of considered approaches tends to increase while increase in RF chains number. Considered parameter details for figure 3; 16 number of transmitting antennas, 32 number of the receiving antenna, 12 channel propagation paths, total number of clusters 4, channel realization 6, 4 receive RF chains, 25 training frames, and -10 SNR with 10 algorithmic iterations.


Figure 4. NMSE efficacy as a proportion of SNR


Figure 5. NMSE efficacy as a proportion of RF chains number

The NMSE efficacy for proposed channel estimation approach versus the channel delay taps number is shown in figure 3, were channel delay taps number i.e., 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 considered. At 4 channel delay taps number, SVT, OMP and VAMP approaches has 3.93%, 21.59 and 29.7% more NMSE as compared to proposed ARSCE approach. The performance is almost stable while changing the channel delay taps number.

At figure 4 the parameter details; 4 number of transmitting antennas, 32 number of the receiving antenna, total number of clusters 4, channel realization 100, 4 receive RF chains, 35 training frames, and -15 to 15 SNR with 100 algorithmic iterations. Figure 4 shows the NMSE efficacy w.r.t SNR, where SNR varies -15dB to 15dB with 3dB interval. At -15dB SNR, OMP and VAMP approaches has got >1dB and 0.91dB which is 48.57%, and 43.63% more NMSE as compared to proposed ARSCE approach. Similarly, at 6dB SNR, OMP and VAMP approaches has got 0.37dB and 0.17dB which is 73%, and 41% more NMSE as compared to proposed ARSCE approach. The performance is optimized at increasing the SNR.


Figure 6. . NMSE efficacy as a proportion of channel paths number

Parameter details for figure 5; 4 to16 number of transmitting antennas, 32 number of the receiving antenna, 12 channel propagation paths, total number of clusters 4, channel realization 6, 16 receive RF chains, 5 training frames, and -5dB SNR with 20 algorithmic iterations. At figure 5 shows NMSE w.r.t RF chains number, where at 12 RF chains, OMP approach has 38.2% more NMSE as compared to proposed ARSCE approach. Parameter details for figure 6; 16 number of transmitting antennas, 32 number of the receiving antenna, 48 channel propagation paths, total number of clusters 4, channel realization 1, 4 receive RF chains, 30 training frames, and -5 SNR with 10 algorithmic iterations. Whereas NMSE w.r.t channel paths number has shown in figure 4.6, SVT approach has shown more NMSE as compared to proposed ARSCE approach at various channel paths number.

5. CONCLUSIONS

In this article, we proposed ARSCE method for wideband mmWave MIMO channel estimates that take use of both the beamspace sparsity and channel’s low rank to enable more accurate channel restoration, particularly for short beam learning intervals. The received training signal matrix at the termination of the extended connection is the low-rank matrix sum, that contains the learning signs after passing across the wideband mmWave MIMO system. Extensive simulation findings demonstrate that the suggested methods perform better in terms of MSE for channel estimation when only short beam train lengths are used and while operating in severe noise circumstances. Several approaches shown in above section has considered for the comparison with proposed approach, and proposed ARSCE model has performed well at receiving optimized channel estimation, which result better throughput and better user quality experience.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The authors would like to thank everyone, just everyone!

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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AUTHORS

Rajkumar M Vadgave

Received the BE in Electronics and Communication Engineering from VTU Belagavi University in 2011 and M.Tech in Communication Systems from VTU Belagavi University in 2013. He is pursuing Ph.D from VTU Belagavi University.He is currently working as Assistant Professor in the Dept of E & CE Veerappa Nisty Engineering College Shorapur from 2013 to till dated. He has authored or coauthored more than 3 refereed journals and conference papers. His research interest includes wireless sensor network, communication system. He can be contacted at email: rajkumarv074@gmail.com

Manjula S

Received the B.E in Electronics and Communication Engineering from Gulbarga University in 1997 and M.Tech in Electronics and Communication Engineering from RVD University in 2006 and Ph.D degree from Singhania University in 2014. She became an Assistant professor in 1998, an Associate professor in 2007 and Professor of E & CE dept in 2014.She has authored or coauthored more than 20 referred journal and conference papers. Her research interest includes Synthesis characterization and microwave properties of conducting polymer composites. Member of ISTE, IETE. She can be contacted at email: manjulasidramshetty@gmail.com

Dr. T.S. Vishwanath

Ph.D in Control System, Institution: Dr MGR Educational and Research Institute University Chennai India, M. E. in Control System, Institution: WCE Sangli, BE in Electrical Engineering, Institution: PDA College of Engineering Gulbarga. Research work at Robust H∞ control and analysis” application to electrical drives. Member of Institute of Engneer (MIE), ISTE, IETE and IJEET. He can be contacted at email: tsvrec1@rediffmail.com 

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